The Silver Scribe

The Stereotypes of Music

Mariano Lopez, Staff Writer

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You see a guy rocking a black leather jacket, mohawk rising tall at 7 inches, with you wondering how many cans of hairspray he had to go through for it to stand like that. You’d think he’d listen to something like heavy metal right? Or a guy with hair down to his hips wearing baggy jeans and a tye dye shirt. Perhaps he enjoys listening to The Beatles? Almost every musical genre has a certain stigma associated with them and for the most part, most of us know what they are.

Country is for cowboys, rap for gangsters, jazz is for loners/misfits etc, but why is it that we think like this? Who, what, and when did we adopt this style of thinking?  For example, have your grandparents ever questioned on how the heck can you stand listening to today’s popular hits? It’s amazing how much music has evolved and how many genres there are. There is something out there for everybody at anytime, and it couldn’t be accessed any easier thanks to the invention of the internet.

Typically when one finds an artist that they like do they not begin to find and identify certain characteristics or ideologies that apply to themselves as well? Perhaps this is where the stereotype begins to come into play. Do people conform into the genre of music that they listen to? This question was asked to Riverton High School Junior, Xzavier Ojeda who said, “Not really because say for example a rapper was to say they killed a guy and robbed a store. I don’t think people would apply that to their own life if that makes sense”.

To which I re-phrased the question to, “But what if an artist had an ideology that opposes government through their music? Do you think this could very well influence someone’s own political stance?”

 

“It’s certainly possible, I guess it just depends on the person since I personally think music has never changed me or influenced me on how I feel about something.” He replied.

 

So I asked another student, Eric Hinkle, another student attending Riverton High School, “Do you think people conform or become influenced by the type of music they listen to?” asked Mariano.

 

“No because, people listen to many types of music and just because they listen to a certain genre of music it doesn’t reflect who they are.” he replied. It seems that people don’t always fit into stereotypes of music. For one to listen to heavy metal they don’t need to have spiked hair or wear eyeliner. For all you know they could be a 10 year old girl that only wears pink, but listens to Slayer on max volume. Point being, music does not define someone.

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The Stereotypes of Music